BEAR FACTS AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
Be aware when camping in bear country.
Keep a clean camp, food out of reach, ect...

A FED BEAR IS A DEAD BEAR
If a bear gets food from you, it is likely
to behave more aggressively towards
the next person it meets.

Bear Tracks
Breckenridge Road - May 23, 2006

If you see a bear or evidence of a bear such as
tracks, droppings or diggings near your camp
it is best to choose another camping area.
(About 10 miles away is recommended)

KEEP A CLEAN CAMP
- Store food in a car trunk or secured area
- Don't sleep near cooking or food storage areas
- Wipe tables and burn grease of the grills
- Dispose of garbage in bear-proof garbage cans,
or pack it out. Bears will dig up buried or burned
garbage
- Store soap and toiletries the same as food.
- Pet food also needs to be secured.

AVOID SMELLS:
Don't use sunscreen, insect repellent, soap,
shampoo, deodorants, body lotions, or similar
products, especially towards the evening hours
and night.

Hanging food and garbage isn't guaranteed
to outsmart a bear.

Don't burn garbage. Food on garbage is rarely
completely burned and makes the problem worse
by spreading the odors...

Don't surprise bears when hiking. Make noise.

Dogs can antagonize bears.

RULES:
There are no rules about what to do if you encounter a bear.
All situations are different, depending on the bear, the terrain
and your reaction. In most cases the bear will detect you first
and leave the area. Never approach a bear under any circumstances.

Bears have good eyesight and an acute sense of smell. If a bear
stands upright or moves closer, it is trying to detect smells in the
air. This is not a sign of aggression. Once it identifies you, it may
leave the area or try to intimidate you by charging to within a
few feet before it withdraws.

BLACK BEARS
If you encounter a black bear
- Black bears are generally shy and avoids human contact.
- Stop and face the bear, backing away slowly. Avoid direct
eye contact as this may be perceived as a threat. Give the
bear plenty of room to leave the area.
- Stay calm.
- If on a trail, step off the downhill side and slowly leave the
area. Don't run or make any sudden movements. Running is
likely to prompt the bear to give chase.
- Make noise while hiking to reduce chances of surprising a bear
- Never get between a female bear and her cubs. Be alert of
other cubs in the area.
- Fight back if the bear attacks. Black bears have been driven
away when people fought back. Use sticks, rocks, or bare hands.
- Report all bear sightings to a park ranger as soon as possible.

BEAR SPRAY / PEPPER SPRAY
Bear spray is a option that is worth consideration.
More information...

GRIZZLY BEAR IDENTIFICATION
Look for a combination of characteristics.
Color and size are sometimes misleading.

Bear Identification
Click for larger view...

Claws of black bears seldom exceed 1 1/2"
Claws of grizzly bears are rarely less than 1 3/4" long.

LINKS:
www.keepmewild.org
www.bebearaware.org
http://www.backcountryattitude.com/bear_safety.html

Bear in Tree
Bear in the tree...
Oakridge, OR

It was the middle of the day, we were sitting
in the car, when this bear walked into camp.
Not seeing the bear, opened the car door...
lucky for us, he was human shy and ran
straight up the tree. Photo is blurry because
of light conditions and it was a dangerous
situation.

Bears are not in the woods to put out forest
fires!!! Never approach or feed a bear.

RATTLESNAKE FACTS
Rattlesnake Facts and Basic Emergency Care.

COUGAR FACTS
Cougar Facts and Safety

CAMPGROUND INDEX

DISCLAIMER:
Information contained on this page
is for general reference purposes only.
Bears can not be predicted...

CAMPGROUNDS OF THE USA
BEAR FACTS and INFORMATION